The effects of the offence are also an important consideration in determining the adequacy of a plea agreement and the victim can offer the court a unique perspective on the impact of the crime. One third of the states allow the victim to be tried orally or in writing in pleas.11 In Missouri, for example, with a view to the adoption by the Tribunal of a Plea Bargain,. . . the court authorizes the victim of such an offence to make a written statement or to appear in person or by a lawyer to make a statement. 12 Although Kansas only asks prosecutors to inform victims of the nature of a plea agreement, victims have the right to hear their views and concerns throughout the criminal proceedings and to bring those opinions and concerns to the attention of the courts when the victim`s personal interests are concerned.13 Most states offer victims some degree of judicial consultation on a negotiated advocacy agreement; However, the extent of their participation varies considerably from one State to another. In no State is the right to lend interpreted as the right to direct the prosecution of the case or to veto the decisions of the prosecutor. As expressly provided by applicable law in Wisconsin, the delivery obligation is . . . In at least 22 states, victims` right to grant to the prosecutor requires a prosecutor to seek victims` advice on the proposed plea.6 In Georgia, the file must be accompanied by a victim impact statement, which can be used by the prosecutor.

at each stage of the proceedings against the defendant. . . . Argument. 7 Illinois prosecutors are required, to the extent possible, to consult with both the victim and review a written impact statement when it has been prepared before entering into a plea agreement.8 South Dakota victims may also express their views orally and in writing.9 but prosecutors must also make reasonable efforts to allow them to express their views on the contractual terms. In New Jersey, victims have the right to attend the preparation and filing of a written statement to the prosecutor, which sets out the effects of the crime and any sentencing recommendations they deem appropriate.10 The Tribunal does not accept any pleading agreement unless the Vermont Supreme Court decision is similar.36 After hearing the testimonies of the victims. The court ruled that the Public Prosecutor`s Office, which questioned the victims during the criminal proceedings about the effects of the offence, did not violate the plea agreement, although the victims requested, during the interrogation, a harsher sentence than had been agreed in the recommendation for pleadings.

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